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U.S. History Portfolio Project 1 - Carr  

Of the domestic issues and conflicts discussed on this page, which had the most positive impact on the development of the US and why?
Last Updated: Nov 6, 2012 URL: http://tmapchs.libguides.com/history Print Guide RSS Updates
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Issues between Jefferson and Hamilton

Image from answersinhistory.wordpress.comWhat were they?

Thomas Jefferson (Antifederalist) thought that America should be an agrarian (farm-based) nation with power resting with the states. Alexander Hamilton (Federalist), on the other hand, thought that America should strive to become an industrial nation. For this to happen, he believed that we needed to establish a strong central government (instead of leaving most of the control to the states).


Useful Websites

Look at this chart outlining the differences between Federalists (like Hamilton) and Antifederalists (like Jefferson)

Read this short article about Hamilton vs. Jefferson from the U.S. State Department

Check out an historian's perspective on how the Hamilton vs. Jefferson debate shaped the political system of America

Find an overview of Hamilton vs. Jefferson from a history teacher's website

 

Introduction

In this guide, you will find links to information related to your U.S. History Portfolio Project. In addition to the websites provided below, you can search for more documents using the ABC-CLIO American History database (use login: tmastudent/tmalaw).

 

 

Whiskey Rebellion

Image from ttb.govWhat was it?

Farmers in the 1790's protested a new tax on whiskey (made from their grain), often using violence to stop tax collectors from taking money. When protestors attacked the home of a U.S. Marshall in 1794, the government quickly sent in militia forces to stop the rebels, and the tax continued to be in effect. The events of the Whiskey Rebellion reinforced the power of the federal government and may have led, in part, to the beginning of political parties in America.

Useful Websites

Check out this website from the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau

Find out more in this entry from Encyclopedia Britannica

Read an overview of events on PBS.org

Look at this article from the National Park Service

Primary Documents

Read the original "Proclamation of the Whiskey Rebellion"

Read George Washington's diary entries about the Whiskey Insurrection

 

Development of the Two Party System

Image from americantimes.orgWhat was it?

The election of 1796 was the first in which candidates from two different parties (the Federalists and the Republicans) competed for office.

Useful Websites

Check out the story of the two party system from ushistory.org

Read an overview of two party political systems from Britannica.com

Look at this thesis about Federalists vs. Republicans

Read this chart from historyteacher.net summarizing the view of the two parties

 

Shay’s Rebellion

Image from veteranstoday.com

What was it?

Shay's Rebellion was a post-Revolution clash between farmers and merchants that threatened to cause a civil war. Instead of war, the economy improved, a popular governor was elected and the Constitution was created leading to an end of the fighting.


Useful Websites

Read this fact sheet about the rebellion and the Constitution

Check out this overview from ushistory.org

Browse this website all about the rebellion

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Kim Ventrella
 

Judiciary Act of 1789

Image from b-womeninamericanhistory.blogspot.com

What was it?

The Judiciary Act of 1789 established a structure for the federal court system and created the position of attorney general. Today's court system is still very similar to the one outlined in this Act.

Useful Websites

Read an overview of the Act from the Senate's website

Check out this article about the Act from the Federal Judicial Center

Find an overview from InfoUSA

Primary Documents

Read a collection of primary documents compiled by the Library of Congress (including a copy of the Act and a diary from a senator)

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